Regarding the film Maleficent, a number of Christians have certainly overreacted to it.

There indeed are movies and television programs that attempt to lure the viewer into embracing the occult.

However, Maleficent did not really seem to be one of them.

Rather, the magical and mythological elements served more as a backdrop against which to consider more mundane themes and human truths.

Though certainly not a traditional rendition of the classic Sleeping Beauty tale, a number of Christian analysts and cultural critics have done a less than complete job in considering the story as presented.

Before condemning the version of Maleficent in this interpretation of the story, shouldn't it be considered what drove her over the edge?

To gain the throne, someone that she once did have feelings for did slip her a roofie and amputated her wings.

In the story, wasn't that sort of an allegorical depiction of being raped?

Furthermore, you can't just expect Princess Aurora to automatically take her father's side in the dispute as she didn't even know that the crazed king was her father until the time she turned 16. She had never really met the man.

However, though mistaken about her original motives, the Princess had considered Maleficent a presence in the background at least throughout her life.

As much as the legalists oppose dating and displays of casual affection, you'd think the movie would get bonus points for making a fuss that the kiss of the prince hadn't had time to develop from infatuation into true love by the time of their second encounter.

Instead of a kneejerk reaction to classical fantasy motifs, perhaps the viewer informed by a Christian worldview should also take the time to consider the message as depicted in the lives of both Maleficent and King Stephan of how the hurts and temptations of life in this fallen world can eventually warp one's soul to the point where the individual is a distorted version of what they use to be.

By Frederick Meekins